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School Safety Information

APS Bullying Prevention Plan

 

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) defines bullying as any unwanted aggressive behavior(s) by another youth or group of youths who are not siblings or current dating partners that involves an observed or perceived power imbalance and is repeated multiple times or is highly likely to be repeated. Bullying may inflict harm or distress on the targeted youth including physical, psychological, social, or educational harm. A young person can be a perpetrator, a victim, or both (also known as "bully/victim").

 

Definition: “Bullying” is a way of using power aggressively in which a person is subjected to intentional, unwanted and unprovoked hurtful verbal and/or physical actions. An act of bullying results in the victim feeling oppressed, fearful, distressed, injured, or uncomfortable. The aggression is repeated on more than one occasion and can include: physical, verbal, emotional, racial, sexual, written, electronic, damage to property, social exclusion, and intimidation. Bullying may be motivated by actual or perceived characteristics such as race, color, religion, ancestry, national origin, gender, sexual orientation or identity, mental, physical or academic disability. Bullying often takes place in a social context. Cyberbullying is a form of bullying.  Albuquerque Public Schools shall consider cyberbullying, or behavior that displays the characteristics of bullying, which occurs in a digital or cyber environment the same as bullying occurring in a traditional or physical environment.  Albuquerque Public Schools therefore prohibits bullying in a digital or cyber environment by all members of the school community with the use of district technology or personal electronic devices whether on or off campus.    Albuquerque Public Schools may take corrective action if a member of the school community has committed an act of bullying in a digital or cyber environment outside of these times/locations and that act of bullying lead to the disruption of a safe, respectful and fear-free environment for another member of the school community. (APS Board Policy J16 Bullying Prevention Procedural Directive)

 

TO DETERMINE A BULLYING INCIDENT: TO QUALIFY AS BULLYING, INCIDENT MUST INVOLVE AN IMBALANCE OF POWER BE INTENTIONAL AND REPEATED BETWEEN THE TARGET AND THE AGGRESSOR. Bullying involves multiple incidences, aggressor (be sensitive to labeling students) & the target have drastically different reactions to the incident, and target feels powerless to self-advocate.

 

 

Procedure for Reporting an Incident of Bullying Behavior

 

  • Staff
    • Referral form is given to the designated administrator (principal or assistant principal).
    • A Harassment/Bullying Incident Referral Form is filled out and turned in to an administrator.

 

  • Students
    • Bystander/Target may bring the incident to the attention of a teacher, counselor, principal, or any school personnel.
    • A Student Harassment/Bully Report Form is filled out and turned in to a Box in the front office or given to a staff person. This box will be checked daily by an administrator.

 

  • Parents
    • Parents are encouraged to report any incidents of bullying to the administrator.

School Policy on Reporting Incidents of Bullying

 

  • Anyone who sees or hears of a bullying incident must report, using an office discipline referral.
  • All referrals should be submitted to the administrator within one day of incident or report of incident.
  • If it is an immediate safety concern, the staff member will contact the office to escort the aggressor who is acting aggressively to the front office to ensure student safety.

 

School Policy on Responding to Incidents of Bullying

 

  • Teachers and other school staff who witness or receive reports of acts of bullying/mistreatment will appropriately intervene and complete referral form.
  • A discovery process will take place where all parties involved (target, bystanders and aggressor(s)/acting aggressively) are interviewed separately [MEDIATION IS NOT APPROPRIATE if bullying is indicated] ensuring the confidentiality of reporters, bystanders, targets and aggressor(s)/person(s) acting aggressively. Findings should be documented on the Discovery Process Form, office discipline referral or Harassment/Bullying Incident Referral Form.
  • Teachers and other staff who are involved with the students will be notified to help monitor and prevent further bullying/mistreatment situations (because many times bullying is subtle, cumulative and retaliatory).
  • If it is deemed a bullying situation, parents of all students involved will be notified of the incident and of outcomes which pertain to their child. REMEMBER you must maintain confidentiality about other students involved.

 

School Policy on Disciplinary Steps to Incidents of Bullying

 

  • Consistent response and consequences for students who act aggressively and bystanders when appropriate per APS district policies and Student Behavior Handbook.
  • Provide classroom guidance curriculum regarding the expected behaviors of the school or classroom, possible consequences for inappropriate behavior, and the school procedure to report incidents of bullying.
  • Conduct a parent education meeting to facilitate a discussion on types of bullying/mistreatment, effective parent responses, and how parents can report incidents of bullying.
  • Administrators/Counselors will be available to talk with target and parents about what would help them feel safer at school.
  • Offer support services to both target and aggressor which are available through school counselor, social worker, and/or the Health & Wellness Team (possibly, a mental health community provider).

Revised January 2012

 

School Bullying Response Roles

 

Roles of All School Staff

  • Anyone who witnesses or receives a report of a bullying incident will intervene and fill out a referral form with specific details to assist with the discovery process.
  • All staff will model, teach and re-teach expected behaviors.
  • All staff will provide ongoing monitoring of the situation.

 

Roles of Support Staff in Collaboration with Administration

  • Counselors will provide classroom guidance regarding expected behavior.
  • Support staff will offer parent training/education on Bullying Prevention.
  • Support staff will offer tip sheets to parents and students.
  • Support services will be provided to all students involved through small group interventions, re-teaching, role play, practice, Health & Wellness Team referrals and FBA/BIP implementation.
  • Support staff may be included in the process of determining if a referral is a bullying situation or normal conflict. In addition, support staff may assist with the discovery process by providing details to the administrator, as appropriate.

 

Roles of Administrator

  • Administrator ensures that yearly training of school staff on the Bullying Prevention Plan and procedures is completed via mandatory Blackboard Training.
  • Administrator will ensure a discovery process is completed on all referrals turned in by staff, students and parents.
  • Administrator will contact parents of all students involved. (Confidentiality of each student and consequences must be maintained.)
  • Administrator meets with parents of involved students.
  • Administrator will determine consequences and recommend school interventions.

 

 

 

 

Differences Between Conflict and Bullying

 

NORMAL CONFLICT

BULLYING

Equal power – friends

Imbalance of power – not friends

Happens occasionally

Repeated negative actions

Accidental

Purposeful

Not serious

Serious – threat of physical harm or emotional or psychological hurt

Equal emotional reaction

Strong emotional reaction on part of the target

Not seeking power or attention

Seeking power and control

Not trying to get something

Trying to gain material things or power

Remorse – takes responsibility

No remorse – blames target

Effort to solve the problem

No effort to solve the problem

 

INTERNET SAFETY

Internet Safety Tips For Parents (all levels)

 

Some Online Behaviors are against the law…

Many view piracy and plagiarism as stealing.  Illegal downloading of movies and music can have serious consequences.  Just as stealing a CD or DVD from a store is wrong, so is stealing online. 

There is an area of the law called Intellectual Properties. Learn about it.  Copying information from the Internet can be illegal and there are risks.

 Learn more:

      www.cybercitizenship.org 

      www.copyrightkids.org

       

 

 

Protecting Your Computer

 

Emails from unknown sources may contain attachments that introduce viruses that permanently damage your computer.  Forwarding emails from unknown sources can reveal your friend’s email address to the sender and possibly infect your friend’s computer with a virus.

 

File sharing can lead to a virus or provide access to information contained on your hard drive.

 

Installing a firewall can help protect your computer from the problems created by hackers.

 

Anti-Virus software can help protect your files.

 

Disconnecting your Internet when not in use is the best way to prevent anyone from using the Internet’s “two way street” to get into your computer.

 

Posting your email address on public sites allows spammers to find it and send you junk mail.

 

 

Remember: Your first and best line of defense is self-defense in cyberspace.

If you suspect that your child has been contacted by predator:

 

Notify law enforcement

    OR

File a complaint online at www.missingkids.com

    OR

Call the Office of the Attorney General at 505-222-9000 and ask for an Internet Crimes Against Children investigator.

 

 

 

 

INTERNET SAFETY

 

All Principals will ensure that staff, students and families receive internet safety information.

 

APS Stay Safe Online

 

The APS Stay Safe Online website: https://aps.blackboard.com/webapps/portal/frameset.jsp?tab_tab_group_id=_2_1&url=%2Fwebapps%2Fblackboard%2Fexecute%2Flauncher%3Ftype%3DCourse%26id%3D_263176_1%26url%3D  contains information on appropriate online behavior for students such as computer-based lesson plans and resources for parents.

 

 

Internet Safety Tips For Parents (High School)

 

Tips for youth to stop cyber-bullying:

  • Don’t initiate, respond or forward harmful messages
  • Think first! If something mean is posted or texted about you, don’t respond immediately. Take a break and give yourself time to think through your next step. 
  • Think about your reputation--would you want your grandma, teacher, future employer or someone you don’t know, to see your post?
  • Trust your gut.  If you feel uncomfortable- save the message and tell an adult.

 

Tips for parents regarding cyber-bullying:

  • Ask your children questions. Maintain an open dialogue.
  • Keep the computer in a common room.
  • Talk about your expectations regarding acceptable online/phone behavior before they receive the privilege.  Behavior online should be the same as what you would do in person or in front of someone you respect.
  • Make agreements and set boundaries about accepted use and behavior for online/phone communication.  Often youth don’t tell parents because they fear losing their technology privileges.
  • Help your child think through how the information they put online reflects on them.
  • Inform youth about legal and future consequences of harmful posing online or by phone.
  • Ask your child to teach you about programs or technologies you don’t understand or of which you don’t have familiarity.
  • Model the behaviors you want to see around phone and internet use.

 

Tempted to meet someone face-to-face that you know only from online chats?
Remember anyone can pretend to be anyone online. A skilled predator will pretend to be exactly the type of person you are looking for; otherwise you wouldn’t be interested in getting together, would you?  If you think you can’t come in contact with a predator, think again.  Predators go anywhere you go on the Internet.

 

Sharing too much information about yourself?

Would you walk around with private information taped on your back, so anyone could read it?  Probably not; however, this is what you are doing when you post private information on social networking sites and don’t have your privacy settings set to PRIVATE or FRIENDS ONLY. You, your friends, and your athletic teams are putting information about you onto the web. If the world can see that information, so can a predator or a stalker. Guard your personal information and ask others to be careful with it as well.

 

There is another potential problem that you might not consider – identity theft.  This is a crime in which someone establishes credit in your name. Unfortunately for you, the credit history that is established will not be a good one, and it will take a lot of time and effort to clean up the mess. Giving out personal information should be your decision. Just because an interesting website asks for your personal information doesn’t mean you should give it out.

 

Be careful posting photos of yourself on the web. Photos placed on public sites can be manipulated and placed back on public sites. Such photos of you might prove to be embarrassing or worse – not the kind of photo you would want a college admissions committee or potential employer to see.

 

 

 

What do you know about intellectual properties? 

Do you know that intellectual properties are protected by copyright law?  And using another’s intellectual properties without their permission is illegal. 

 

Many owners of intellectual properties view piracy and plagiarism as stealing.  Illegal downloading of movies and music can have serious legal and monetary consequences.   The music industry has taken legal action against some offenders, typically costing the person thousands of dollars to resolve.

 

Plagiarizing can seriously damage your academic record which could adversely affect college admission or getting a job.

 

EXAMPLES OF INTELLECTUAL PROPERTIES

Music Recordings

Videos

Photographs

Drawings

Magazine Articles

Computer Games

Computer Software

Books

 

 

 

 

 

 

Internet Safety Tips for Parents

 

 

(Elementary School)

 

The Internet offers a world of resources and poses a variety of dangers for our youth, such as: viruses that could harm your computer; pedophiles that are trying to meet your child; disclosing personal information that could lead to identity theft; and cyber-bullying.  Every parent must recognize these dangers in order to help their child learn to protect his/her self online. The following are some safety tips for parents of elementary students who use the Internet.

 

Tips for youth to stop cyber-bullying:

  • Don’t initiate, respond or forward harmful messages.
  • Think first! If something mean is posted or texted about you, don’t respond immediately.  Take a break and give yourself time to think through your next step. 
  • Think about your reputation--would you want your grandma, teacher, future employer or someone you don’t know, to see your post?
  • Trust your gut.  If you feel uncomfortable, save the message and tell an adult.

 

Tips for parents regarding cyber-bullying:

  • Ask your children questions. Maintain an open dialogue.
  • Keep the computer in a common room.
  • Talk about your expectations regarding acceptable online/phone behavior before they receive the privilege.  Behavior online should be the same as what you would do in person or in front of someone you respect.
  • Make agreements and set boundaries about accepted use and behavior for online/phone communication.  Often youth don’t tell parents because they fear losing their technology privileges.
  • Help your child think through how the information they put online reflects on them.
  • Inform youth about legal and future consequences of harmful posing online or by phone.
  • Ask your child to teach you about programs or technologies you don’t understand or of which you don’t have familiarity.
  • Model the behaviors you want to see around phone and internet use.

 

Teach Your Children the Following Rules:

      Never accept files or downloads from unknown sources. This includes familiar sources if you were not expecting them.

      Choose an email address/ screen name that DOES NOT contain any part of your name, age, gender, interests or favorite activities.

      Do NOT fill out a profile without parent review and approval.

      NEVER give out real name, telephone or cell phone number(s), mailing address, or passwords.

      Do NOT enter chat rooms.

      Do NOT post photographs in publicly accessible sites.

      The settings for ANY social networking profiles* should be PRIVATE, and new friends are accepted only if they are known to the child AND parent.

*Social networking sites include: FaceBook, Twitter, Instagram, Snapshot etc.

 

Talk to your child about the dangers online.

Your child should know that:

Accepting files or downloads from unknown sources can bring a virus that could harm the computer.

Giving away personal information can lead to identity theft or worse.

People may not be who they say they are online. (Predators roam cyberspace.)

It is important to keep passwords private.

Open communication with your child is vital.  Your child needs to feel they can come to you if they encounter frightening communications or images without fear of losing Internet privileges.

 

If you have a webcam, your child should use it ONLY if you are present.  Posting pictures online or sending images can have dangerous consequences.  Parents must control such activity.

 

Note to Parents:  There are many organizations and activities in which your child may be involved that post information online in public locations.  It is extremely important for you to pre-approve any information about your child that will be posted for the world to see. Remember, cyber predators are looking too.

 

 

 

Internet Safety Tips For Parents (Middle School)

 

If you have a profile on a social networking site*:

Set up profile to Private or Friends Only – otherwise private information can be spread very quickly to known and unknown people.

Only add people to your friends list that you already know.

Protect your personal information as well as personal information about your friends.

If you are too young to be on a site, don’t lie about your age to join.

Delete mean or embarrassing comments.

Beware of invitations through comments or bulletins to view videos or click on links. They may be attempts to capture your password and introduce a virus.

 

Tips for youth to stop cyber-bullying:

  • Don’t initiate, respond or forward harmful messages
  • Think first! If something mean is posted or texted about you, don’t respond immediately.

Take a break and give yourself time to think through your next step. 

  • Think about your reputation--would you want your grandma, teacher, future employer or someone you don’t know, to see your post?
  • Trust your gut.  If you feel uncomfortable, save the message and tell an adult.

 

Tips for parents regarding cyber-bullying:

  • Ask your children questions. Maintain an open dialogue.
  • Keep the computer in a common room.
  • Talk about your expectations regarding acceptable online/phone behavior before they receive the privilege.  Behavior online should be the same as what you would do in person or in front of someone you respect.
  • Make agreements and set boundaries about accepted use and behavior for online/phone communication.  Often youth don’t tell parents because they fear losing their technology privileges.
  • Help your child think through how the information they put online reflects on them.
  • Inform youth about legal and future consequences of harmful posing online or by phone.
  • Ask your child to teach you about programs or technologies you don’t understand or of which you don’t have familiarity.
  • Model the behaviors you want to see around phone and internet use.

 

Remember that anyone can lie online.  A stranger could be a cyber predator if:

The stranger asks for your picture.

The stranger invites you to view their web cam.

The stranger asks if you are alone.

The stranger talks about sexual matters.

The stranger wants to meet you in person.

If you are thinking about posting your pictures on a public site, think about this: Once you have placed your picture on a public Internet site, it’s out there forever and there is no taking it back.

Software manipulation of photographs makes it possible for that photo to be altered and put back on the Internet or traded among child pornographers.

 

 

 

Be anonymous:  Don’t give away personal information in your user name or screen name.  Don’t use passwords that are easy to guess (i.e., the name of your pet).

Is Your Computer Protected?

What do you do with email from unknown sources?   Opening an email from an unknown source, particularly if there is an attachment, may introduce a virus that could permanently damage your computer.

Do you post your email on public sites? Spammers can find your email on the Internet and use it send you junk email.

Does it have anti-virus software installed?  Protect your files and computer from virus attacks that can prove disastrous.

Do you have a firewall?  One of the best ways to protect your computer from the ravages of hackers is to install a firewall.

Do you know the dangers of file sharing?  Someone could infect your computer with a virus or access information from your hard drive.  This could be particularly devastating if financial information is stored on the computer.

Do you forward emails from unknown sources?  You may think you are being helpful, but by forwarding the email, but you have just provided your friend’s email address to an unknown source.  And, if there is an attachment, you may have forwarded a virus.

Do you disconnect the Internet when it’s not in use?  This is the best way to prevent anyone from using the Internet’s “two-way street” to get into your computer.

 

 

*Social networking sites include: FaceBook, Twitter, Instagram, Snapshot, etc.